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2018 in 12 Images: Year in Review — ULAS News

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We’ve excavated on a wide range of projects in 2018. Here we showcase 12 images taken throughout the year, highlighting our main discoveries, click on the images to read more from each project.

via 2018 in 12 Images: Year in Review — ULAS News

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Seven Million Years of Human Evolution

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This video from the American Museum of Natural History provides a useful synopsis of the different hominin species. Today, our closest living relatives are chimpanzees, but extinct hominins are even closer. Where and when did they live? What can we learn about their lives? Why did they go extinct? Scientists look to fossils for clues.

Multiple episodes of interbreeding between Neanderthal and modern humans

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A new article published in Nature discusses the evidence for Multiple episodes of interbreeding between Neanderthal and modern humans. This provides additional evidence for the ubiquity of archaic admixture in recent human history, consistent with other recent work showing that humans interbred with Denisovans multiple times.

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Bosworth Links 2018 Test-Pit Results Announced — ULAS News

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New evidence of Neolithic, Roman and Anglo-Saxon activity found in community archaeological dig at Market Bosworth. In 2016, the Bosworth Links project set out to reveal the, then, poorly understood development and habitation of Market Bosworth. The main research goals, to learn more about what was going on in the area before the town was […]

via Bosworth Links 2018 Test-Pit Results Announced — ULAS News

The Human Journey: Homo floresiensis

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In our final session of the Human Journey, we looked at Homo floresiensis, also known as the Hobbit. The origins of this species – a human relative only a little over a metre tall – have been debated ever since its discovery in 2004. This video from Nature discusses this question:

If you wish to find out more about this species, the following may be of interest:

The Human Journey: Homo sapiens in Australia and the Americas

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In our last session of the Human Journey, we looked at how Homo sapiens continued to spread across the globe, reaching as far as East Asia, Australia and the Americas.

In East Asia and Australia, we looked at sites such as Niah Cave and Lake Mungo.

Whilst in the Americas we discussed the evidence for the pre-Clovis and Clovis people. Those interested in finding out more about the latter, may wish to listen to the episode on Clovis Points from the BBC’s History of the World in 100 Objects series.

This short video clip from National Geographic looks at the skeleton of a teenage girl determined to be the one of the oldest and most complete human skeletons ever discovered in the New World.

The Human Journey: Homo Sapiens

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In our last session of ‘The Human Journey’, we looked at the appearance of our own species, Homo sapiens, and various theories about how we spread around the world.

Further reading on this subject includes:

This short video clip helps to illustrate some of the proposed routes:

The Human Journey: The Neanderthal Thorax

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Following on from the recent post about Neanderthals and Denisovans, comes news of a new virtual, three-dimensional reconstruction of the thorax of an adult, male Neanderthal  which is presented in Nature Communications. Analysis suggests that the Neanderthal thorax had a different shape to that of modern humans, leading the authors to propose that Neanderthals may have had a subtly different breathing mechanism.

Beginner’s Guide to Archaeology: Metal Detecting, Nighthawking and the Portable Antiquities Scheme

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In our last session we looked at the Treasure Act 1996Treasure Trove in Scotland, metal detecting, nighthawking and the Portable Antiquities Scheme.

This video is of a lecture entitled “The Treasure Act and Portable Antiquities Scheme: experience from South of the Border” that was given by Roger Bland, Keeper of the Department of Britain, Europe and Prehistory at the British Museum joint with the National Museums Scotland, to the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland in 2014 on the application of the Treasure Act and the development of the Portable Antiquities Scheme to record discovered artefacts.