A child’s footprint from Roman Lincoln

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Archaeology is the study of people. No matter how caught up we get in studying building remains or the minute details of changing object typologies, our ultimate aim is to better understand our ancestors. Aside from the discovery of human remains, and even surpassing them in some sense, is the discovery of traces of an […]

via A child’s footprint from Roman Lincoln — Roman Lincolnshire Revealed

Secrets of the Stone Age: Polished Stone Axe

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In our last session of ‘Secrets of the Stone Age’ we briefly discussed the Neolithic polished stone axes. A podcast about the jade axe in the British Museum, part of the BBC Radio 4 series ‘A History of the World in 100 objects’ is available to listen to and download from the BBC website. This podcast tells the story of how this object may have been used and traded and how its source was cunningly traced to the heart of Europe.

Reading List: Secrets of the Stone Age

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Whilst it is not essential to do any background reading before the course begins, you may find it useful to do so. The reading list below contains books that you can read. You don’t have to read all of these and we don’t specify any that you must read. Instead, these are readings you can use to gain a preliminary understanding of topics, as well as to study in more depth those parts of the course you are particularly interested in. You may also want to take a look at magazines such as British Archaeology, World Archaeology and Current Archaeology.

Further suggestions about ways you can extend your understanding of topics through books, television etc may also be posted as appropriate here on the tutor’s personal blog, as well as on the WEA East Midlands Region History Space.

Cunliffe, B. 2013. Britain Begins. Oxford University Press.

Darvill, T. 2010. Prehistoric Britain. Routledge.

Gosden, C. 2003. Prehistory: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.

Malone, C. 2001. Neolithic Britain and Ireland. The History Press.

Miles, D. 2016. The Tale of the Axe: How the Neolithic Revolution Transformed Britain. Thames & Hudson Ltd.

Murphy. A. 2012. Newgrange: Monument to Immortality. Liffey Press.

Oliver, N. 2012. A History of Ancient Britain. W&N. (accompanies BBC TV documentary series of the same name. Documentary also available on DVD).

Parker Pearson, M. 2014. Stonehenge: A New Understanding. Experiment.

Pryor, F. 2004. Britain BC: Life in Britain and Ireland Before the Romans. Harper Perennial.

Richards, C, Jones, R and Jeffrey, S. 2016. The Development of Neolithic House Societies in Orkney. Windgather Press.

Thomas, J. 1999. Understanding the Neolithic. Routledge.

From the Ice Age to the Stone Age: Neanderthals

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In our last session, we looked at perhaps one of the most famous ancient hominids, Neanderthals. Those wishing to find out more about them, may want to check out the following additional podcasts and video clips:

From the Ice Age to the Stone Age: Happisburgh

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A series of footprints that were left by early humans around 900,000 years ago were discovered by a team of scientists led by the British Museum, Natural History Museum and Queen Mary University of London. The footprints left in ancient estuary muds were found at Happisburgh in Norfolk and are direct evidence of the earliest known humans in northern Europe. This video provides more information about the discovery.

From the Ice Age to the Stone Age: Boxgrove

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In the first session of ‘From the Ice Age to the Stone Age’, we examined the earliest evidence for hominins in Britain. One site that was mentioned as having significance to this story was Boxgrove in West Sussex. This short video clip from BBC’s 2002 documentary, ‘Apeman’, shows the refitting of flint fragments from that site.

Reading List: From the Ice Age to the Stone Age

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Whilst it is not essential to do any background reading before the course begins, you may find it useful to do so. The reading list below contains books that you can read. You don’t have to read all of these and we don’t specify any that you must read. Instead, these are readings you can use to gain a preliminary understanding of topics, as well as to study in more depth those parts of the course you are particularly interested in. You may also want to take a look at magazines such as British Archaeology, World Archaeology and Current Archaeology.

Further suggestions about ways you can extend your understanding of topics through books, television etc may also be posted as appropriate here on the tutor’s personal blog, as well as on the WEA East Midlands Region History Space

Bahn, P. 2012. Cave Art: A Guide to the Decorated Ice Age Caves of Europe. Frances Lincoln Press.

Clottes, J. 2016. What Is Paleolithic Art?: Cave Paintings and the Dawn of Human Creativity. University of Chicago Press.

Cook, J. 2013. Ice Age art: arrival of the modern mind. British Museum Press.

Cunliffe, B. 2013. Britain Begins. Oxford University Press.

Darvill, T. 2010. Prehistoric Britain. Routledge.

Dinnis, R and Stringer, C. 2014. Britain: One Million Years of the Human Story. The Natural History Museum.

Gosden, C. 2003. Prehistory: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.

Milner, N et al. 2013. Star Carr: Life in Britain after the Ice Age. Council for British Archaeology.

Oliver, N. 2012. A History of Ancient Britain. W&N. (accompanies BBC TV documentary series of the same name. Documentary also available on DVD).

Oppenheimer, S. 2007. The Origins of the British: A Genetic Detective Story. Robinson.

Pettitt, P and White, M. 2012. The British Palaeolithic: Human Societies at the Edge of the Pleistocene World. Routledge.

Pryor, F. 2004. Britain BC: Life in Britain and Ireland Before the Romans. Harper Perennial.

Roberts, A. 2010. The Incredible Human Journey. Bloomsbury. (accompanies BBC TV documentary series of the same name. Documentary also available on DVD).

Stringer, C. 2006. Homo Britannicus: The Incredible Story of Human Life in Britain. Penguin.

Waddington, C. 2007. Mesolithic Settlement in the North Sea Basin: A Case Study from Howick, North-East England. Oxbow Books.

Britain’s Ancient Capital: Secrets of Orkney

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Learners who recently took the ‘Secrets of the Stone Age’ course or who will be taking it later in the New Year may be interested to watch a new documentary series starting on BBC 2 on Monday 2nd January 2017 at 9pm.

Orkney – seven miles off the coast of Scotland and cut off by the tumultuous Pentland Firth, the fastest flowing tidal race in Europe, is often viewed as being remote. But recent discoveries there are turning the stone age map of Britain upside down. Rather than an outpost at the edge of the world, recent finds suggest an extraordinary theory – that Orkney was the cultural capital of our ancient world and the origin of the stone circle cult which culminated in Stonehenge.

In this three-part series, Neil Oliver, Chris Packham, Andy Torbet and Dr Shini Somara join hundreds of archaeologists from around the world who have gathered there to investigate at one of Europe’s biggest digs.

Mandacus and his whetstone – a new inscription from Roman Lincolnshire — Roman Lincolnshire Revealed

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The Portable Antiquities Scheme have recently recorded a new object from Lincolnshire with that most interesting of things – an inscribed personal name. The object in question is not actually a recent find, but has only recently come to light for recording – a perfect example not only of what important objects might still be […]

via Mandacus and his whetstone – a new inscription from Roman Lincolnshire — Roman Lincolnshire Revealed